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Presentations at the conference "Sustainable Use of Abandoned Mines in the SADC Region"

Written by  Wednesday, 24 January 2018 07:49
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Presentations, including the FSE’s presentation, held at the conference “Linking Science, Society, Business and Policy for the Sustainable Use of Abandoned Mines in the SADC Region” are now accessible here:

 

http://www.assaf.org.za/index.php/2-uncategorised/416-linking-science-society-business-and-policy-for-the-sustainable-use-of-abandoned-mines-in-the-sadc

Presentations 

DAY 1

Strengthening Mining Policies and Research in the SADC Region, Mr Nikisi Lesufi, Senior Executive, Chamber of Mines of South Africa 

Responsibilities of the Competence Centre Mineral Resources – Business Considerations on Both Sides, Mr René Zarske, Head of Competence Centre for Mineral Resources, Southern African-German Chamber of Commerce and Industry, South Africa 

Strengthening Collaboration between R&D and Industry, Mr Bernd Oellermann, Director, Department of Trade and Industry, South Africa 

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

Why this Conference? Prof Frank Winde, Head of Mine Water Re-Search Group, North-West University, South Africa 

How Mining Can and should be a Benefit to Investors, Workers, Local Communities and Host Nations, Mr Bobby Godsell, Director, Industrial Development Corporation, South Africa 

Cleaning Up After Mines Long Gone:Understanding the Complex Dimensions for Inclusive Development, Dr Shingirirai Mutanga, Senior Research Specialist and MISTRA Fellow, Human Science Research Council (HSRC), South Africa 

An Innovative Approach to Socio-Economic Closure on the West Rand of Johannesburg, Mr Grant Stuart, Senior Vice-President: Environment, Sibanye Gold, South Africa 

Mine Legacy Sites: A Brief Global Overview on Remediative Approaches to Date, Prof Christian Wolkersdorfer, SARChI Chair, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa 

DAY TWO

SESSION II: THE CHALLENGE OF MINING LEGACY SITES

Environmental Health Impacts of Mining in Africa, Prof Theophilus Clavell Davies, Professor, Department of Geology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria 

The Legacy of Mining – Results of a Survey on Abandoned Mines in South Africa, Dr Henk Coetzee, Specialist Scientist, Council for Geoscience, South Africa 

The Legacy of Mining: Perspectives on Past Practice and Future Options – A Community-Centred View from South Africa, Mr David van Wyk, Lead Researcher, Bench Marks Foundation, South Africa 

The Challenge of Mining Legacy,  Mr Marius Keet, Acting Provincial Head, Department of Water and Sanitation, South Africa

Experience in Mine Remediation Case Study Germany: Uranium Mining, Dr Michael Paul, Division Head, WISMUT GmbH, Germany

Case Study Germany: Hard Coal Mining, Dr Boris Dombrowski, DMT GmbH & Co. KG, Germany

SESSION IV: REMEDIATION EXPERIENCES II

Remediating Mining Legacy Sites – International Experiences and Lessons Learned by the IAEAMr Horst Monken-Fernandes, Engineer, International Atomic Energy Agency, Austria

Remediating Mining Legacy Sites: Chilean Tailing Bodies – Structural Understanding, Water Behaviour and the Option of Selective Recovery, Dr Nils Hoth, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, (University of Resources), Germany

Remediating Mining Legacy Sites: Case Study China, Prof Qingshan Zhu, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

UPHES Feasibility: Case Study South AfricaProf Frank Winde, Head of Mine Water Re-Search Group, North-West University, South Africa

Implementing Pumped Hydro Energy Storage at an Open Pit Gold Mine: A Pilot Project from AustraliaMr Simon Kidston, Executive Director, Genex Power Limited, Australia

UPHES Feasibility: Case Study FinlandMr Ernst Zeller, Regional Director, Pöyry Energy GmbH, Austria

DAY THREE

SESSION VI: UPHES TECHNOLOGY II

UPHES Feasibility: Case Study Germany – Ore Mines (EFZN Study), Prof Uwe Düsterloh, Clausthal University of Technology, Germany 

UPHES Feasibility: Case Study Germany – Hard Coal Mines, Prof André Niemann, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany 

Harvesting Geothermal Heat from Mine Water – A Pilot Project from Germany, Dr Nils Penczek, Ruhr University Bochum, Germany 

SESSION VII: OTHER INNOVATIVE APPROACHES

Geothermal AMD Treatment, Dr Thakane Ntholi, Researcher, Council for Geoscience, South Africa 

Recovery and Reprocessing of Mine Tailings – Experiences from Germany, Prof Tobias Elwert, Clausthal University of Technology, Germany 

Resource Extraction from Mine Waste Water, Mr Hans-Jürgen Friedrich, Fraunhofer Institute, Germany 

SESSION VIII: MINING LEGACY: LEGAL AND SOCIAL ASPECTS

Transforming Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining in Africa through Research and Training, Mr S. Felix Toteu, UNESCO Nairobi Office, Kenya

Mining-Affected Communities: Risks, Expectations and Opportunities, Ms Mariette Liefferink, CEO, Federation for a Sustainable Environment, South Africa 

MINING

FSE COMMENTS - Millsite Tailings Storage Facility Reclamation Project

Comments on the Millsite Tailings Storage Facility Reclamation Project: Wetland Sensitivity Mapping and Impact Assessment Freshwater Resource Assessment in the Vicinity of the Proposed Lindum Railway Decommissioning Freshwater Resource Assessment in the Vicinity of the Proposed Millsite Reclamation Surface Water Assessment Report Groundwater Assessment Report Integrated Water Use Licence Application for the Sibanye-Stillwater Rand Uranium/Cooke Operations Integrated Water and Waste Management Plan in support of the WULA   The following comments are submitted on behalf of the Federation for Sustainable Environment (FSE). The FSE is a federation of community based civil society organisations committed to the realisation of the constitutional right to an environment that is not harmful to health or well-being, and to having the environment sustainably managed and protected for future generations. Their mission is specifically focussed on addressing the adverse impacts of mining and industrial activities on the lives and livelihoods of vulnerable and disadvantaged communities who live and work near South Africa’s mines and industries.  

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