Nuclear News

NNR responds; FSE asks for more

Written by Tuesday, 11 November 2014 16:29

On 25 June 2014 the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) had a quarterly meeting with several Non-Governmental Organisations to discuss matters of concern. During this meeting, a presentation was made by Ms M Liefferink, Chief Executive Officer of the Federation for a Sustainable Environment (FSE). Ms Liefferink requested response from the NNR on a number of concerns previously raised.  These were documented and the NNR provided a written response.

Contaminating livelihoods

Written by Wednesday, 30 July 2014 08:53

Hundreds of thousands use Wonderfonteinspruit catchment area tainted by mining waste

With nowhere else to live, many seek refuge in the radiation wastelands in Gauteng, unaware of the deadly dangers the abandoned mining areas present.

The Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) invited Mariette Liefferink to speak at its expert conference on the environmental and social impacts of uranium mining in South Africa.
The CEO of the FSE presented a paper on the environmental, health and social impacts of the reclamation of uraniferous tailings within the Witwatersrand goldfields during the 2014 conference in September, 2014. The FSE's participation in the conference is sponsored by the African Uranium Alliance.

Can we trust our nuclear watchdog

Written by Sunday, 07 April 2013 19:33

The immediate case of the disaster at Fukushima may have been a natural once, but the official report to Japan's parliament says the ultimate culprit was a weak regulation - a lesson South Africa cannot afford to ignore.

FACIAL TREATMENT:  Patience Mjadu, 44 inside her shack in Tudor Shaft informal settlement, with her face smeared with toxic soil from mining waste mixed with skin lotion and water. Mjadu believes the soil helps with her pimples and protects her face from the sun.

Mine dumps - "toxic threat"

Written by Wednesday, 04 January 2012 08:49

Despite intensive and extensive investigations undertaken and reports issued by several government departments several years ago into the health hazards associated with a toxic environment in the Johannesburg region, the situation persists with little to no remedial action taken to date.

Soweto, Johannesburg - Thousands of people face evacuation from greater Johannesburg in the Gauteng province - the economic heartland of South Africa - due to toxic sludge from abandoned gold mines laced with high radiation levels.

Residents use radioactive mud as an acne cure

Written by Sunday, 27 November 2011 07:32

Experts warn old mine dumps could cause birth defects and brain disorders

Patience Mjadu can't bear the pimples that dot her face. So, like other women in her impoverished informal settlement, she has resorted to a novel but potentially dangerous form of treatment involving toxic and radioactive mining waste.

In the wasteland that is Johan Kondos’s farm, a lush green field brings hope.

“This is what a farm is supposed to look like,” he says, gesturing proudly to his prized lucerne crop, seemingly untainted by the surrounding mining pollution.

This lone field, and a few beloved cattle, is all Kondos has left of his farm in Hartbeesfontein in the North West.